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CVCC is a trademark by the Honda Motor Company for a device used to reduce automotive emissions called Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion. This technology allowed Honda's cars to meet the 1970s US Emission requirements without a catalytic converter, and first appeared on the 1975 ED1 engine. It is a form of stratified charge engine.

Honda CVCC engines have normal inlet and exhaust valves, plus a small auxiliary inlet valve which provides a relatively rich air / fuel mixture to a volume near the spark plug. The remaining air / fuel charge, drawn into the cylinder through the main inlet valve is leaner than normal. The volume near the spark plug is contained by a small perforated metal plate. Upon ignition flame fronts emerge from the perforations and ignite the remainder of the air / fuel charge. The remaining engine cycle is as per a standard four stroke engine.

This combination of a rich mixture near the spark plug, and a lean mixture in the cylinder allowed stable running, yet complete combustion of fuel, thus reducing CO (carbon monoxide) and hydrocarbon emissions.